Comments from Commodore Alec Campbell (SIS anti-terrorist unit)

 

My first actual meeting with Vaughan was when he stepped through the aircraft door into the airbridge at Heathrow Terminal 5. The immediate impression was of a good-looking man, alert and confident in his manner, in fact instantly likeable. We had been tracking his ordeal as best we could up until he reached the US coastline and frankly I had expected him to return home immediately he had made contact with, and been debriefed by the FBI. To my surprise he accepted their request to stay and assist them in tracking down Murata’s henchmen. That I feel was the start of his marriage breakdown, though his wife denied it when I asked her, and without his help God knows what would have happened.

The next day I recall visiting the safe house his family had been staying at, and recording in detail his experiences from the fateful day the terrorists arrived at Bosham to his departure from Washington. By the end of his tale I knew that I could do with him as part of my team, but I could not recruit him on the basis of so little information, and of course there was his family and marriage to consider. The traumas that he and his family had endured during the Kinoko Kumo affair changed their lives beyond recognition. Being very brave has a price tag, and Vaughan’s was his marriage. There was nothing we could do apparently to help, and my word we tried.  When he decided to, as he put it, get on with his life, none of us even dreamt of what would happen.

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